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RAF C-130 Hercules: First Military Flight Lands At St Helena Airport

The RAF, Lockheed Martin C-130J Hercules flying over King and Queen Rock, at St Helena Airport.

The RAF, Lockheed Martin C-130J Hercules flying over King and Queen Rock, at St Helena Airport.

ST HELENA AND ITS MILITARY HISTORY | Darrin Henry

Ok, to be fair, the first military landing at St Helena Airport was actually a Royal Navy helicopter off HMS Lancaster in 2015, so really I should say today’s C-130 Hercules has become the first fixed wing military aircraft to land here.

Only A Short Runway Needed

A decent crowd turned out for this early Sunday afternoon treat, lining the roadsides and regular viewing points around the Millennium Forest. We took up station a little further along, on the end of Horse Point ridge, an hour before ETA. Perfect conditions it seemed, warm with very little wind. After setting up the tripod we settled in for the wait, munching on some tasty but slightly ‘toasted’  mince pies Sharon had made this morning.

On another stakeout! Waiting at Horse Point for the arrival of the first military (fixed wing) aircraft to land at St Helena Airport, a RAF, C-130J Hercules.

On another stakeout! Waiting at Horse Point for the arrival of the first military (fixed wing) aircraft to land at St Helena Airport, a RAF, C-130J Hercules.

The Lockheed Martin C-130J Hercules arrives at St Helena, Sunday 18 December 2016, for its first fly by to take a look at the airport before landing.

The Lockheed Martin C-130J Hercules arrives at St Helena, Sunday 18 December 2016, for its first fly by to take a look at the airport before landing.

The fly over on the first pass from Bradley's, photographed by Pat Henry. RAF, C-130J Hercules at St Helena Airport.

The fly over on the first pass from Bradley’s, photographed by Pat Henry.
RAF, C-130J Hercules at St Helena Airport.

We heard the distinctive C-130 propeller growl before we spotted the aircraft itself, north, just out to sea from The Barn. Wheels up on this ‘runway 20’ approach, it was clear this was going to be a fly-by for the Herc, which it did, then turned around and made its second approach on ‘runway 02,’ the southern side. Wheels down this time, the plane did a much lower pass, not quite a touch and go, but no doubt a landing would have been a doddle had they wanted to.

Acutal landing was done on the third approach, from the north end, ‘runway 20,’ or The Barn end, as locals will know it.

From our position at Horse Point it looked as easy as you like, but then it’s what you would expect from a C-130. The aircraft didn’t touch down until half way up the runway and seemed to come to a stop almost immediately, turning directly into the taxi-way, not needing the extra length to slow down. The most difficult thing for me was tracking the plane as it camouflaged so well against the rocky background of King and Queen Rock.

HMS St Helena the Aircraft Carrier

The sight of such an iconic aircraft on St Helena will no doubt be fuel for the military conspiracy theorists. I remember first hearing opinions voiced at local public information meetings 10 years ago that this airport was being built for the military.

Making a low pass over St Helena Airport using the southern, runway 02 approach. RAF, C-130J Hercules at St Helena Airport.

Making a low pass over St Helena Airport using the southern, runway 02 approach.
RAF, C-130J Hercules at St Helena Airport.

The low profile camouflage paint job almost hides the RAF C-130J Hercules against the King and Queen headland, topped by Prosperous Bay Plain House. RAF, C-130J Hercules at St Helena Airport.

The low profile camouflage paint job almost hides the RAF C-130J Hercules against the King and Queen headland, topped by Prosperous Bay Plain House.
RAF, C-130J Hercules at St Helena Airport.

Following on from the recent successful Atlantic Star flight in October and Brazil’s, Embraer Aviation tests earlier this month, here’s what we know about today’s C-130 visit.

The aircraft has flown down from Ascension Island, 700 miles north-west of St Helena.

It’s a Lockheed Martin C-130J Hercules, operated by the Royal Air Force.

St Helena Government and Airport authorities have informed us the flight has been commissioned by the Department for International Development (DfID) and will be here for a day, returning to Ascension tomorrow.

The purpose of the visit is to conduct an assessment of the operating and landing conditions at St Helena Airport.

The crew are not doing any media while they are here.

Keep Calm, We’re British

Back to the military base speculation.

Was St Helena Airport built for the British military? I don’t think so somehow.

Would the military make use of the island’s airport in the event of a conflict or crisis in this part of the world? Well yes, I expect they would.

St Helena’s a British island after all and supporting the military is nothing new. From the days of Napoleon’s exile to more recent times when the island’s ship was seconded to support the Falklands war effort. Saints also serve in the British forces.

On the ground at 13:24, Sunday 18 December, 2016. RAF, C-130J Hercules at St Helena Airport.

On the ground at 13:24, Sunday 18 December, 2016.
RAF, C-130J Hercules at St Helena Airport.

But the military is not all bullets and bombs; the modern frontline is often humanitarian aid, logistical support and natural disasters. St Helena has also needed military aid of the non-fighting kind.

In 1991 a US military aircraft operating from Ascension Island help coordinate a search and rescue at one of our seamounts, 90 miles off-shore, after a fishing boat, which included St Helenian crew, capsized and sank.

More than 30 years earlier, in January 1958, a US military C-124 Globemaster made a “mercy flight” from Recife, Brazil, dropping a medical container with anti-tetanus serum onto the island, saving the life of a critically ill 14 year old St Helenian girl.

St Helena’s isolated location means at some point in the future it is likely to be the best place to stage an air operation from.

The Royal Air Force turning up here to check out the facilities makes sense. I don’t want to read much more into it.

On this lazy Sunday, a week before Christmas, the arrival of the C-130 is just another milestone in the story of St Helena Airport; a good excuse for a drive after lunch for a lot of people.

Time now for more important things – some of those burnt mince pies and Spurs vs Burnley on TV.

COYS!

On the airport stakeout menu today, lovely mince pies, fresh from the oven where they stayed perhaps a little tiny bit too long! RAF, C-130J Hercules at St Helena Airport.

On the airport stakeout menu today, lovely mince pies, fresh from the oven where they stayed perhaps a little tiny bit too long!
RAF, C-130J Hercules at St Helena Airport.

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