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The Marching Peabody Ducks in Memphis, Tennessee

The Duckmaster putting the red carptet in place, ready for the marching Peabody Ducks in Memphis at the Peabody Hotel, in Tennessee.

The Duckmaster putting the red carptet in place, ready for the marching Peabody Ducks in Memphis at the Peabody Hotel, in Tennessee.

ROLLING OUT THE RED CARPET | Darrin Henry

Sitting on the floor here in Memphis competing for space to watch a bunch of ducks waddle on a red carpet makes me realise that perhaps back home in St Helena our quirky traits could have a definite role in our fledgling tourism venture.

Most Reliable Tourist Attractions in The World

The Marching Peabody Ducks in Memphis, Tennessee are a 5 o’clock guarantee, so much so that they place fourth in the world’s top 10 most reliable tourist attractions. According to the ‘Duckmaster’ anyway.

Tourists begin to gather at the fountain of the Peabody Hotel in advance of the marching Peabody Ducks in Memphis.

Tourists begin to gather at the fountain of the Peabody Hotel in advance of the marching Peabody Ducks in Memphis.

 

Marching Peabody Ducks in Memphis - March of the Peabody Ducks at the Peabody Hotel fountain, completely at ease with all the people crowding around to take pictures.

Marching Peabody Ducks in Memphis – Standing around the Peabody Hotel fountain, completely at ease with all the people crowding around to take pictures.

 

The Peabody Hotel is quite posh, which makes the presence of ducks in the lobby very quirky.

The Peabody Hotel is quite posh, which makes the presence of ducks in the lobby very quirky.

Let me explain. In the Peabody Hotel, in downtown Memphis, ducks have been kept on the roof since the 1930s. Every morning at 11am they are brought down in the lift to the hotel lobby fountain. The ducks are trained to ‘march’ the 10m to the fountain where they spend the day, before ‘marching’ back to the lift at 5pm, returning to a specially constructed $200,000 enclosure on the roof. Not too shabby.

Marketing gurus everywhere must drool at the success of this simple formula that pulls in people from far and wide. The eccentricity of the whole thing taps into our natural curiosity for anything unusual.

Inside The Peabody Hotel

We thought we’d get here early, but at 4.25pm the hotel lobby is already very full. The ducks seem unfazed by the attention, happily splashing about, in and around the fountain as though ducks in the lobby of a posh, four star hotel is normal.

With 25 minutes to go the ceremonial red carpet is rolled out and prime viewing spots are quickly claimed. Children sitting cross legged on the floor are in front, which is where we are too, nicely positioned near the lift doors.

 

Everyone is in position, the red carpet is down, we are ready for the march of the Peabody Ducks.

Everyone is in position, the red carpet is down, we are ready for the march of the Peabody Ducks.

 

The Duckmaster makes a grand speech about the traditions of what we are about to witness as the well drilled ducks, line up behind him waiting on the signal. It’s fantastic drama.

Marching Peabody Ducks in Memphis, By The Left…

And then, 5pm on the dot, the ritual begins. The ducks waddle up the red carpet as dozens of camera flashes go off. I’m trying to get a shot from floor level so I’ve pre-focused the camera on wide angle, set focus to manual and am shooting blind, or real ‘point and shoot’ to be exact.

 

The march is underway and the ducks perform like true professionals.

The march is underway and the ducks perform like true professionals.

 

Marching Peabody Ducks in Memphis underway at the Peabody Hotel, in Memphis, Tennessee.

Marching Peabody Ducks in Memphis underway at the Peabody Hotel, in Memphis, Tennessee.

 

The marching Peabody Ducks in Memphis in their stuttery motion go by ahead of the Duckmaster, glancing left and right at their audience. In a moment it’s all over, the lift doors close and the Peabody Ducks are gone.

Everyone is smiling and comparing pictures. We’ve all just watched some ducks walk past but it could have been a Hollywood celebrity, that’s how we feel. How mental is that?

“Suckers,” I imagine the marketing guys saying while rubbing their hands together with glee. But I don’t care. I heard about the marching Peabody Ducks in Memphis event many years ago and I feel privileged to have finally seen it.

 

Some of the souvenirs in the hotel gift shop.

Some of the souvenirs in the hotel gift shop.

I mentioned St Helena earlier – the whole spectacle has me thinking. Back home we have plenty of ducks, even more chickens. We have our famous endemic wirebirds; could we train the wirebirds? Perhaps Jonathon our giant tortoise could perform a ceremonial entry to the paddock each day? Mind you, that could take forever with a tortoise and especially one that’s believed to be over 180 years old.

We leave the hotel and start walking toward Beale Street to find something to eat. We are still talking about the marching Peabody Ducks in Memphis.

 

Marching Peabody Ducks in Memphis – The Facts

Peabody Ducks – The Facts According to the Peabody, in 1933 the hotel’s General Manager, Frank Schutt and a friend, Chip Barwick, placed the ducks in the fountain as a joke after consuming a little too much Jack Daniel’s Whiskey. However, the ducks proved so popular with guests that they became a permanent feature. In 1940, Edward Pembroke, a former circus animal trainer, then a bellman at the hotel, offered to help train the ducks. He became the first official Peabody Duckmaster, a position he famously held for 50 years. The ducks have gained celebrity status over the years, however, their stint at the hotel lasts just three months before retiring to a local farm. The Peabody Ducks are five North American mallards. One drake (male) with white collar and green head and four hens (females) with less colourful plumage. Duck is not served anywhere at The Peabody and has not been seen on the hotel’s menu since 1981, quite possibly making Chez Philippe the only French restaurant in the world that does not offer duck.

Marching Peabody Ducks in Memphis – The Facts
According to the Peabody, in 1933 the hotel’s General Manager, Frank Schutt and a friend, Chip Barwick, placed the ducks in the fountain as a joke after consuming a little too much Jack Daniel’s Whiskey.
However, the ducks proved so popular with guests that they became a permanent feature. In 1940, Edward Pembroke, a former circus animal trainer, then a bellman at the hotel, offered to help train the ducks. He became the first official Peabody Duckmaster, a position he famously held for 50 years.
The ducks have gained celebrity status over the years, however, their stint at the hotel lasts just three months before retiring to a local farm.
The Peabody Ducks are five North American mallards. One drake (male) with white collar and green head and four hens (females) with less colourful plumage.
Duck is not served anywhere at The Peabody and has not been seen on the hotel’s menu since 1981, quite possibly making Chez Philippe the only French restaurant in the world that does not offer duck.

 

Read all about our 12 hours Walking In Memphis in this two part post: Part 1 and Part 2

COMMENTS

  • Larry Macemore

    October 5, 2015

    Sorry, I got my days mixed up. We drop the possum on Jan 1, we let the groundhog see his shadow on Feb 2.

  • Larry Macemore

    October 5, 2015

    We have a possum drop every Feb, 2 in North Carolina, hard to believe what people will go see. I’m enjoying your road trip around the world.

    • October 5, 2015

      Just looked up the NC possum drop Larry, hadn’t heard of this one. Fascinating tradition. Thanks for your comment and feedback – next time we’ll have to try make it to North Carolina. Cheers.

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