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Hiking on St Helena – Lot’s Wife’s Ponds Post Box

Start of the trail. Hiking on St Helena.

Hiking on St Helena – Start of the trail for Lot’s Wife’s Ponds post box.

A ST HELENA POST BOX WALK | Sharon Henry

We almost cancelled the walk to Lot’s Wife’s Ponds because of the rain. It didn’t look good as we drove through the Sandy Bay district, shrouded in fog. Fern, bamboo and banana trees were dripping wet. We dropped altitude below cloud cover to magically find the beach area clear and dry with patches of blue sky. This looked promising; it was like another world compared to the rest of the island.

There were six of us. What The Saints Did Next were tour guides for Post Box newbies; Leroy and Kayla, locals determined to explore their island and Robin and Karen on a short visit from the UK cramming in as many activities as they could.

Hiking on St Helena In Volcanic Sandy Bay

They jumped out the car full of enthusiasm for their first Post Box walk. Laces tightened and back packs strapped on, we made our way to the Ponds, a walk the Nature Conservation Group rates as 6/10 for effort and 8/10 for the terrain.

An engraved wooden stake marked the start and plenty of wooden arrows and stone cairns along the route ensured we didn’t wander off the path. The first 20 minutes took a little exertion as we zigzagged up and away from the beach area. The stark contrast of Sandy Bay’s landscape was quite amazing, from the densely foliaged highland to the parched coastal lowland. We clambered over volcanic terrain full of colours and rock formations you might expect to see on Mars, paying careful attention not to trip or twist ankles.

A stone marker cairn near the amazing red earth at the start of the hill climb.

Hiking on St Helena, Lot’s Wife’s Ponds. A stone marker cairn near the amazing red earth at the start of the hill climb.

Truly dramatic terrain on the Lot's Wife's Ponds walk.

Hiking on St Helena. Truly dramatic terrain on the Lot’s Wife’s Ponds walk.

'Babies Toes' growing along the pathway.

‘Babies Toes’ growing along the pathway to Lot’s Wife’s Ponds.

Wild tomato bushes can be found on one part of the walk.

Hiking on St Helena, Lot’s Wife’s Ponds. A surprise, wild tomato bushes found on one part of the walk.

The highest point on the walk at 210m above sea level is a good water stop.

Hiking on St Helena, Lot’s Wife’s Ponds. The highest point on the walk at 210m above sea level has great views of Gorilla’s Head and Asses Ears.

Growing along the way are chubby ‘babies toes,’ a succulent endemic plant resembling their namesake. The small lime green toes are stubbed with white daisy-like flowers, very pretty on the stony ground.

As we reached the top of the path a little sweaty and red faced, Lot’s Wife column, Asses Ears and Gorilla’s Head (likeness is uncanny) came into view. Enjoying the gentle breeze at that point we stopped for water and admired the scenery.

Masked Booby Seabird On The Nest

We pushed further on and the trail gradually sloped down along a cliff face toward a plateau displaying rock graffiti; ‘FIZZLES ME’ (with an arrow pointing left) and ‘LOTS WIFES PONDS’ with an arrow pointing right. We had no idea where Fizzles Me would lead, but to the Ponds we were headed.

Near the puzzling sign and just off the path we saw a masked booby seabird incubating a speckled egg. There are multiple nests scattered along the jagged edges of the remote hillsides. Throughout the walk we caught distinctive whiffs of pungent stale guano and could hear the birds’ resonant quacking.

The path winds around the rocky hillside. Note the walkers in this picture.

The path winds around the rocky hillside (spot the people). Lot’s Wife itself can be seen at the top.

Hiking on St Helena, Lot's Wife's Ponds. Some of the rock formations are just stunning.

Hiking on St Helena, Lot’s Wife’s Ponds. Some of the rock formations along the way are just stunning.

A lone masked booby nesting near the path keeps its egg hidden.

A lone masked booby nesting near the path keeps its egg hidden.

Careful, careful.

Careful, careful.

We headed in the direction of the ‘right’ arrow, negotiating small scree sections and came upon white sandy patches, seemingly dumped inland by helicopter, such is the distance it’s located up on the hillside. White sand is a novelty on St Helena as the few coastal beaches we have contain black sand. This is the only place you’ll find the gleaming stuff. If only we could transport it around the coast to Sandy Bay beach!

The Lot’s Wife’s Ponds Post Box Stamp

At this point the rock ponds of Lot’s Wife came into view below, so we picked up the pace and hurried to the plastic pipe Post Box, sticking out of the ground that held the walk comments book and ink stamp. It had taken 1 hour and 30 minutes to get there. We stamped our arms, took selfies and prepared for the final 30m descent to sea level, beckoned by the alluring Ponds below.

Leaving a message in the Post Box visitors' book.

Leaving a message in the Post Box visitors’ book. Note the white sand in the background, a rarity on St Helena.

Hiking on St Helena, Lot's Wife's Ponds. One stamp each.

Hiking on St Helena, Lot’s Wife’s Ponds. One stamp each.

The final descent.

Hiking on St Helena, Lot’s Wife’s Ponds. The final descent using the rope for support.

Walking across the flats that are the Ponds.

Walking across the flats that are the Ponds.

Up to this point the walk was not difficult; a reasonable level of fitness was required with a generous helping of sure-footedness. But the last bit was tricky and involved a little backward shuffling down a steep rock face holding onto a secured length of thick rope. Easy peasy if you don’t look down!

St Helena’s Hiking Trail Where You Go Swimming

But, once you’re down you won’t regret it. We stepped onto a pebbled beach, a tall funnel-shaped stack towered over us and we marvelled at the absolute beauty of the Ponds. Small bodies of sea water trapped in bowls of rock, some deep, most shallow, reflected the brightening sky. It looked strikingly like a natural infinity pool of sorts. A low rock wall is the only protection from the choppy ocean on the other side where occasional waves came lapping over to refresh the Ponds. Playful five finger (pilot) fish darted about, mean-looking crabs scurried for cover and spiky sea urchins stood their ground. We couldn’t wait to get in.

A wonderful reward, cooling off in the Ponds.

A wonderful reward, cooling off in the Ponds.

Testing out the underwater camera.

Testing out the underwater camera.

The salt content in the Ponds is high making floating a doddle.

The salt content in the Ponds is high making floating a doddle.

A six person selfie while treading water - not as easy as it looks!

A six person selfie while treading water – not as easy as it looks!

The rock surface underwater was mossy and quite slippery; the cool water initially drew sharp intakes of breath as we eased ourselves in and stretched out in one of the largest Ponds. Some of us kept our shoes on as protection from sea urchins and jagged edges. Swimming didn’t require much effort as the high salt content gave us incredible buoyancy. We frolicked about like children, scattering small sea creatures to the safe confines of rocky recesses. The Pond was quite deep in places requiring well executed duck dives to touch the bottom.

Time To Go Home

This was the first time for us to test our brand new Panasonic underwater camera. Either it would work and we’d get some brilliant shots, or not, and we’d lose all the images of the walk. A bit timid and not totally reassured by the thin rubber seal we took the ‘plunge’ and submerged it. Underwater testing was a lot of fun!

We reluctantly got out after an hour, totally sated, to dry off in the mild sun and to replenish energy levels with chocolate biscuits, fruit and Twiglets. Then with squelching wet shoes we pulled ourselves up over the rock face and made the return journey in 1 hour 20 minutes, just as dark grey clouds started to gather.

Beginning the long walk back. Note the chimney stack which is near the climbing rope.

Hiking on St Helena, Lot’s Wife’s Ponds. Beginning the long walk back. Note the chimney stack which is near the climbing rope.

The cloudy weather started rolling in on the way back.

The cloudy weather started rolling in on the way back.

Swimming in the Ponds was a serene and blissful experience and we were truly taken with Lot’s Wife’s Ponds. The spot is pristine and unspoilt, perhaps because of its remote location. Although it is a relatively easy hike for competent walkers it is not easily accessible to all. Which is a bit of a shame, but then again maybe this is a good thing.

Disclaimer: The information in this article is not intended as to validate the safety or otherwise of the walk route. Trails are subject to change depending on weather conditions, plant growth and natural erosion. Walkers unfamiliar with the walks on St Helena should seek the assistance of a competent local guide.

COMMENTS

  • November 25, 2016

    Loved the photos, captured the splendid views as always guys! It’s a really nice walk, bot really too strenuous and so worth overcoming a fear of heights to descend the rope scramble for a swim in the pools!

  • Larry Macemore

    May 13, 2016

    Love Gorilla’s Head, looks like King Kong. Great photos.

    • May 21, 2016

      Yeah crazy how a rock formation can look so real it’s one landmark that’s easy to pick out 🙂

  • Peter Scott

    March 1, 2015

    I walked from my sister’s house in 2004 to the ponds at 5am and built an Inukshuk (an Inuit term meaning “someone was here” or “you are on the right path”) with those piles of rock that still remain in one of these pictures, not the one in the picture, but that’s ok too! Love lots wife ponds, a place of solitude.

    • September 2, 2015

      Wow if only we’d chanced to have taken a photo of your ‘Inukshuk’ ! We love Lot’s Wife’s Ponds too – an awesome spot to chill out.

  • G anthony

    February 28, 2015

    My husbands a saint we’ve been back twice, hope to come back again ,love it there hope the island doesn’t get spoilt when the airport is open , its a lovely payed back island and the people are so friendly xx

    • G anthony

      February 28, 2015

      Layed back that’s ment to be xx

    • September 2, 2015

      So glad that you’ve enjoyed your visits to the island. The airport is just around the corner and it’s up to us Saints to keep the island friendly and laid back so it doesn’t get spoilt. 🙂

  • Sandra crowie.

    January 31, 2015

    Excellent !!!!
    Is the only words i can say to these amazing pictures !!!!!!!

    • September 2, 2015

      Thanks Sandra – the Pond’s really is one of St Helena’s beauty spots 🙂

  • Billy Leisegang

    January 27, 2015

    This takes me back to the many times we have done this hike and never tired of it. St Hekena has many beautiful hikes.
    An excellent article, I am hooked on your excellent coverage of Island activities.
    WELL DONE

    • September 2, 2015

      Thanks Billy – sorry for the delay in replying. Hopefully it won’t be too long before we see you back here on one of these hikes again. 🙂

  • January 26, 2015

    Very interesting

  • rosemary walton

    January 26, 2015

    you guys make me want to go and visit as in all my life I have never got up the energy to go !! all the best X

    • January 27, 2015

      No time like the present Rosie, it’s an amazing walk. You will love it 🙂

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